What is the difference between sole custody and full custody?

When parents decide to divorce or legally separate, they need to make arrangements for the custody of their children.

how a father can lose a custody battle
how a father can lose a custody battle |Stewart Law Group

There are many types of child custody, and it is important to choose the one that best suits the family’s situation and the child’s best interests.

Two of the most common types of child custody are sole custody and full custody. But what is the difference between them? And how can you get them?

What is sole custody?

Sole custody is when one parent has the sole authority and responsibility for the child.

This means that the other parent has no legal rights or responsibilities towards the child, and cannot make any decisions.

The other parent also does not have any visitation rights with the child, unless the court orders otherwise.

Sole custody is usually granted to one parent when the other parent is unable or unwilling to care for the child, or when there is a history of domestic violence, abuse, neglect, substance abuse, or criminal activity by the other parent.

Sole custody can be awarded to either the mother or the father, depending on the circumstances of the case.

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What is full custody?

Full custody is when one parent has the primary physical and legal custody of the child.

This means that the child lives with one parent most of the time, and that parent has the right to make all the major decisions.

However, unlike sole custody, the other parent still has some rights and responsibilities towards the child.

Full custody is usually granted to one parent when the other parent agrees to it.

Full custody can also be awarded to either the mother or the father, depending on the factors that the court considers, such as the child’s preference, the relationship between the parents and the child, the stability of the home environment, and the ability of each parent to provide for the child’s needs.

Is full custody the same as joint custody?

No, full custody is not the same as joint custody. Joint custody is when both parents share the physical and legal custody of the child.

This means that the child spends an equal or substantial amount of time with both parents.

Joint custody is the ideal outcome when both parents are safe and responsible, and can communicate.

How to get sole custody or full custody?

To get sole custody or full custody of your child, you will need to go to court and request it.

You will need to provide evidence that shows why sole custody or full custody is in the best interests of the child.

You will also need to show that you are capable of providing for the child’s physical, emotional, and financial needs.

The court will consider various factors when deciding on the type of custody to grant, such as the child’s age, health, personality, and wishes, the parents’ income, lifestyle, and mental health, the history of the relationship between the parents and the child, and the potential impact of the custody arrangement on the child’s well-being.

Getting sole custody or full custody can be a challenging and complex process, and it may involve a lot of legal paperwork, court hearings, and negotiations.

Therefore, it is advisable to consult a family law attorney who can guide you through the process and protect your rights and interests.

Conclusion

Sole custody means that the other parent has no rights or responsibilities towards the child.

Full custody means that the other parent still has some rights and responsibilities, such as visitation and child support.

The type of custody that is granted depends on the best interests of the child and the circumstances of the case.

To get sole custody or full custody, you will need to go to court and prove why it is necessary and beneficial for the child.

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